Eight Sixteen

Ask me anything   a smörgåsbord of words & style
beyonce:

Dereon 2010
Photo Credit: Tony Duran
Tattoo Art: Ash Wood

beyonce:

Dereon 2010

Photo Credit: Tony Duran

Tattoo Art: Ash Wood

— 3 weeks ago with 3079 notes
beyonce:

Dereon 2010
Photo Credit: Tony Duran
Tattoo Art: Ash Wood

beyonce:

Dereon 2010

Photo Credit: Tony Duran

Tattoo Art: Ash Wood

— 3 weeks ago with 4482 notes

devoutfashion:

"Mirroir Noir" -  Gaschette Mag, Palesa by Marijke Willems 

(Source: devoutfashion)

— 3 weeks ago with 156 notes
kalifornia-mercy:

blissfully-chic:

Lorde for The Wild Magazine’s Youth Issue, 2013.  
Photographed by: Stevie Verroca & Mada Refujio 

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kalifornia-mercy:

blissfully-chic:

Lorde for The Wild Magazine’s Youth Issue, 2013.  

Photographed by: Stevie Verroca & Mada Refujio 

-

(via jadore-mode)

— 1 month ago with 45 notes

yagazieemezi:

WOMAN ON THE RISE:

From little sister to full-blown star, Solange in the cool girl on the block.

Read the full interview here.

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JULIA NONI

FASHION EDITOR: JOANNA HILLMAN

(via harpersbazaar)

(via devoutfashion)

— 1 month ago with 4480 notes

rufftoon:

sevnilock:

Jack/Elsa You are not alone.~︶⌣︶✿

I don’t usually have much interest in ships/pairings (completely neutral), or reblog them, but this is pretty.

Wow

(via graphic-design-fashion)

— 1 month ago with 86012 notes

cultureunseen:

Nobel Queen, Wise Mother and Elder Sister TONI MORRISON!

Born February 18, 1931 (83 years of wisdom)
Nobel Prize, Pulitzer Prize, Presidential Medal of Freedom and so much more…..

(via exquisiteblackpeople)

— 2 months ago with 6834 notes

postwhitesociety:

gradientlair:

Have you ever heard Zora Neale Hurston’s voice? In addition to being an exquisite novelist and anthropologist, she recorded some songs for a past government organization, the WPA. According to Florida Memory:

The Works Progress Administration (WPA) - after 1939, the Works Projects Administration - was a work-relief program created in 1935 by President Franklin Roosevelt’s administration that employed over 8.5 million people before its end in 1943. One of its programs was the Federal Writers Project (FWP), which included a Folklore Section. This section conducted fieldwork, recording songs, traditions, and stories across the nation. 

The song above is called “Dat Old Black Gal.” To me, the “new shoes” mentioned makes me think of a new path—a change from the pain ascribed upon Blackness. It makes me think of an old Black spiritual where the lyrics include "travelin’ shoes Lord, got on my travelin shoes." And this journey symbolized by the need for new shoes could be thought of in a physical/emotional/cultural sense (i.e. The Great Migration), in an existential sense (i.e. contemplating the meaning of the journey of life, one’s identity beyond oppression) and/or in a theistic sense (i.e. shoes for the journey on “the narrow way”; how the “next” journey in life is going to heaven). But it is a railroad work song and often work songs were about getting through the labor but thinking of a future time when that labor would no longer be a reality or again, the next great journey. I feel as if some of these early Black songs like this one are pre-cursors to Afrofuturism.

The Florida Memory site has a bunch of audio recordings of her singing. It’s so thrilling for me to connect a voice to this talented genius who had great style, wisdom, and truly respected Black humanity by crafting stories of our complexities, imperfections and beauty so well. She was so ahead of her time.

this did something to me

(via 2brwngrls)

— 2 months ago with 1117 notes
"Life is going to present to you a series of transformations. And the point of education should be to transform you. To teach you how to be transformed so you can ride the waves as they come. But today, the point of education is not education. It’s accreditation. The more accreditation you have, the more money you make. That’s the instrumental logic of neoliberalism. And this instrumental logic comes wrapped in an envelope of fear. And my Ivy League, my MIT students are the same. All I feel coming off of my students is fear. That if you slip up in school, if you get one bad grade, if you make one fucking mistake, the great train of wealth will leave you behind. And that’s the logic of accreditation. If you’re at Yale, you’re in the smartest 1% in the world. […] And the brightest students in the world are learning in fear. I feel it rolling off of you in waves. But you can’t learn when you’re afraid. You cannot be transformed when you are afraid."

Junot Díaz, speaking at Yale  (via malinche)

Those final four sentences are something else.

(via genericlatino)

(Source: avelvetmood, via 2brwngrls)

— 2 months ago with 19706 notes

Dresses. Beautiful. Gorgeous. Stunning by Fenty B Parker.   I’m so in love.

— 2 months ago
stormtrooperfashion:

Lupita Nyong’o in “A Defining Moment” by Steven Pan for DuJour Magazine, Winter 2013

stormtrooperfashion:

Lupita Nyong’o in “A Defining Moment” by Steven Pan for DuJour Magazine, Winter 2013

(via exquisiteblackpeople)

— 3 months ago with 299 notes